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     Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Q. Why are some highways in Saskatchewan in such bad condition every spring?
A. As road beds thaw in the spring, potholes, surface breaks and cracks are common on our highways. Breaks in the road are caused by the expansion (freezing) and contraction (thawing) of water below the surface of the road.

Q. What is the Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure doing to improve these highways?
A. In the short term, crews undertake temporary repairs during the spring and in wet conditions to ensure the highway is safe and passable. More permanent repairs are completed when the subsurface has dried enough to allow the repairs to be more effective. Over the longer term, the Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure has developed a strategy for Thin Membrane Surface (TMS) highways. Improvements are made to TMS highways every year, but those improvements are balanced against the needs of the entire provincial road network.

Q. What is the Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure doing to ensure motorist safety on highways in poor condition?
A. The Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure marks broken pavement areas and installs signs warning the public of potentially hazardous road conditions. Motorists are also encouraged to contact the Highway Hotline for up-to-date information on road conditions and repairs. Additional information is available through the Ministry’s webpage, Facebook, Twitter and media alerts.

Q. How come I don’t see the same problems with highways in other provinces or countries?
A. Thin Membrane Surface roads were originally constructed in rural Saskatchewan in the 1960s and 1970s to provide a dust-free alternative to gravel roads for light vehicle traffic, but they are vulnerable to damage in wet conditions or heavy traffic. Today, there are more than 5,000 km of TMS highways within the provincial highway network. No other Canadian province or territory operates or maintains TMS highways.

Q.  What should motorists do when they encounter highways in poor condition?
A. Motorists should slow down, pay attention to the signage and be aware of any breaks in the roads. Before heading out on the road, they’re encouraged to contact the Highway Hotline for up-to-date information on road conditions and repairs. Additional information is available through the Ministry’s webpage, Facebook, Twitter and media alerts.

Q.  Where can I get information on work zones and what do when driving through the work zone?
A.  Information pertaining to the work zone can be found by clicking here.  

Q.  Where can I get road information on closures, construction detours and winter road conditions?
A.  The Ministry's Highway Hotline provides this type of information. You can also follow the Highway Hotline on Twitter and on Facebook.  

Q.  I am interested in working for Saskatchewan Highways and Infrastructure.  How do I apply for a job?
A.  Most positions are posted and hired through the Public Service Commission.  You can look for weekly job postings and apply right on line. 

Q. How many snow plows are in the province?
We have 300 snow plows operating throughout the province to clear snow and ice for safer winter driving.  They operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week and work on a priority system.

Q.  How do I license my car, trailer or R.V?
A. In Saskatchewan, Saskatchewan Government Insurance (SGI) is responsible for vehicle registration.  Contact SGI for more information.

Q.  How many roads are there in Saskatchewan?
A.  There are 26,000 km of provincial highways. Including municipal roads, Saskatchewan's total road surface is 160,000 km - enough roads and highways to circle the equator four times.

Q.  How many ferries and airports does the province operate?
A.  The Ministry operates 12 ferries, one barge and 17 northern airports.

Q.  Where do I get a trucking permit?
A.  The Ministry does not issue permits. Permits are the responsibility of SGI. You can contact them at 775-6969.

Q.  How can I get information about the process the Ministry uses when purchasing land to construct a highway?
A.  From time to time, some highway projects require the Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure (MHI) to buy more land. There is a process that is followed which can be found here.



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